The birthday of our home and native land is just around the corner, so we’ve got the perfect excuse to plan a stellar red-and-white-themed bash. But you’ll quickly find that a simple celebration can cost a lot more than you’re willing to spend. That’s okay! You can still throw a quaint Canada Day shindig without having to give up on all your patriotic party hopes and dreams.

From simple and reusable décor to snacks that’ll satisfy any true Canadian’s taste buds, learn how to throw a Canada Day party for your friends and family, all for under $50.

Canada Day Party

To begin, gather a few home décor pieces and party supplies you already own. This can include anything from a reusable banner, snack labels (along with a chalk pen), twine for the sandwiches, platters and a crate for the display, and some form of tea lights.

Décor Expenses:
Chip cups: $2
Poutine containers: $2
Napkins: $1
Flowers: $7
Sparklers: $1
Total: $13

For the food, it’s only appropriate to serve every cliché, most-loved food Canada has to offer. This includes BLTs, poutine, ketchup chips, butter tarts and maple doughnuts.

Food Expenses:
Bread, Canadian bacon, lettuce, tomatoes and mayonnaise for BLTs: $14
Smoke’s traditional poutine: $10
Ketchup chips: $3
Maple doughnuts: $5
Butter tarts: $4
Total: $36

Total Cost: $49

Maple Doughnuts

For the focal point on the table, stack maple doughnuts on a cake stand, sitting on top of a crate. I figured they’re maple, they’re doughnuts — surely they deserve the utmost attention at a Canadian affair, right? If you’re looking to make doughnuts from scratch, try this recipe for Anna Olson’s Maple Glazed Doughnuts.

Canadian BLTs

Make mini versions of our country’s favourite sandwich, the BLT, and line them up on a long platter. Want to opt for a heartier sandwich? Try this Fried Chicken BLT Melt recipe.

Canadian BLTs

Use twine to tie red and white striped napkins around the sandwiches for an al fresco feel.

Smoke's Poutine

And what Canada Day celebration would be complete without our country’s signature food, poutine? Use takeout-inspired boxes to display five mini servings of these gravy-doused, cheese-topped French fries. But if you want to add a little more flair to your poutine, try making your own version of Smoke’s Nacho Grande Poutine.

Butter Tarts

For a dessert that has “Made in Canada” written all over it, butter tarts are the way to go. Made with eggs, sugar, raisins, and of course, butter, this quintessential dessert features a buttery, flaky crust and super-sweet filling. How could we Canucks resist? If you have a little extra time on your hands, try this recipe for Anna Olson’s Pecan Butter Tarts.

Ketchup Chips

Chances are you won’t be able to find ketchup chips outside of the country, so it’s quite necessary to serve Canada’s “exclusive” snack at your little shindig. Set out portions of ketchup chips in red and white striped, easy-to-grab cups.

Canada Day Food Table

Accent the table with some mercury tea lights as vases to hold daisies.

Doughnuts and Sparklers

And of course, to continue with tradition, sparklers can be added for the finishing touch to the celebration.