By Teresa Huegle, as told to Jasmine Mangalaseril

For Teresa Huegle, food and restaurants are in her blood. Her extended family owned several restaurants and cafés in Waterloo County before her parents opened Angie’s Kitchen (now The Original Angie’s Since 1962) in Uptown Waterloo in 1962. Today, this Waterloo landmark continues to offer foods once favoured by the area’s early German settlers.

When my parents opened Angie’s in the ’60s, hot beef sandwiches and fish and chips were the big things here. Schnitzel really didn’t become famous until the Kitchener-Waterloo Oktoberfest was established a few years later, in 1969.

Customers didn’t want to wait until the festival came, so schnitzel became part of the food we’d serve. All the local university teams ate here—schnitzel was for the pregame meal or for the party after they won. Later, it became part of our catered banquets, while in the restaurant, schnitzel became a staple for an evening meal, or on a bun at lunch.

angies-restaurant_blogembed

Originally, our breakfasts were bacon, eggs, toast, jam and sausages, but people started asking for an egg on top of schnitzel. We eventually created a breakfast platter with Oktoberfest sausage, Krug’s smoked sausage, schnitzel, eggs and a slice of lemon.

While some of the guys like it, the full breakfast platter is a very, very big meal. I think to finish the platter you need to be young and know you can wear it all off! I’ve dissected it and cut the portions a bit, so you can get a taste and have just one of the sausages or schnitzel. At breakfast, sauerkraut isn’t normally served, but you can certainly have it. Personally, I love the flavour combination of lemon on top of schnitzel with eggs and salt and pepper.

My father was Greek, and my mother was Italian, so food was always a part of our lives. Since I was the eldest of five, I was constantly in the kitchen as the clean-up girl. My mum was cooking all the time, and I learned by watching her. My parents used to bread chicken, and also pork, so basically the schnitzel was a family recipe. I married a German-Austrian, which means schnitzel also came into my life through his family.

For me, a great piece of schnitzel is made with salt, pepper and garlic. At home, I’ll often serve it with fresh homemade applesauce. If the kids want pasta on the side, I might add oregano to the breading, just to give it a different flavour. I make a curried schnitzel salad by adding chopped celery, onions, curry powder and mayo to leftover schnitzel that I’ve cubed—it’s awesome!

Schnitzel is a treat, and a treat can also be healthy and fun. For those who aren’t supposed to have salt, take it out, but add some oregano and thyme. Will you miss the salt? Not if you’ve got lemon juice squeezed over it!

When we think of schnitzel, we think of fun. We think of beer. We think of a good time. That’s part of this community, what Kitchener-Waterloo is.

Pork Schnitzel, courtesy of Teresa Huegle

fried-pork-schnitzel_blogembed

Prep time: 10 minutes
Cook time: 20 minutes
Yield: 4 servings

Ingredients
4 boneless pork loin pieces
1 cup (250 mL) flour, mixed with salt and pepper to taste
2 eggs
splash milk
4 cups (1 L) bread crumbs, mixed with salt, pepper and garlic powder to taste
Extra-virgin olive oil for frying
Lemon wedges for serving
Applesauce for serving

Directions
1. Place each pork loin between sheets of plastic wrap. Gently pound each loin with meat tenderizer until thin and even. (The wrap will help prevent splattering the counter and yourself.)
2. Put seasoned flour in shallow bowl or pan, making sure seasoning is well mixed into flour.
3. In second bowl or pan, whip together eggs and milk.
4. In third pan, add seasoned breadcrumbs, again making sure seasoning is well mixed.
5. Dredge each loin in flour, then dip in egg mixture, then in bread crumbs. Pat lightly; put on plate until frying pan is ready.
6. Heat oil in pan. Fry each schnitzel until golden and crispy, about 3 minutes per side. Drain on paper towels.
7. To serve, place schnitzels on platter with lemon wedges. Serve with fresh applesauce. For breakfast, I add any style of eggs. You will love the flavours with a bit of extra salt and pepper on your eggs and a squeeze of lemon on your schnitzel. Yummy!

Click here to print, save or share this Pork Schnitzel recipe.

Do you have a delicious dish to share with the rest of Canada? Submit your recipe for a chance to be featured on Great Canadian Cookbook and Food Network Canada!