Aside from the peeling of cooked beets, what other food can cause so much stain and splatter? Pomegranates, that’s what — but deseeding a pomegranate while submerging it in water makes the process quick, easy and hassle-free.

Pomegranate

How to Deseed a Pomegranate

Pomegranate_Half

There are several methods for deseeding pomegranates and even special “tools” that can be purchased, in my experience there is only one method that is easy and does not cause a mess: the underwater method.

Pomegranate_Crown

Cut off the pomegranate’s “crown.”

Pomegranate_Scored

Score the pomegranate with a paring knife, marking off four quarters. Lightly cut through the exterior rind.

Pomegranate_Split

Use your fingers to gently pry apart the four sections. This is possibly the messiest part; if you are a fun parent, let your kids help. If you hate cleaning (like I do), tell the kids there is a “surprise” hidden somewhere in their room and quickly do this part on your own while they are searching for who knows what.

Pomegranate_Pry_Seeds

Lower one quarter of the pomegranate into a bowl of cold water (make sure you choose a bowl big enough to work in with both hands). Pry apart the flesh and gently push out the seeds (arils). Underwater, the seeds will not fly all over or splatter.

Pomegranate_Sunken_Seeds

The seeds will sink to the bottom and you can pick out the white pith floating on top. Strain.

Pomegranate_Seeds

Now, eat plain with a spoon or add them to yogurt or oatmeal. You can buzz these in a food processor, strain and have a glass of your very own pomegranate juice!